Partners Forum – Rome, Oct 16-18

JLI co-hosted the Faith Action for Children on the Move Forum with ore than 185 leaders originating from 38 countries and representing 85 organizations gathered at the General Curia of the Society of Jesus in Rome. The forum shared learning around three key evidence-based themes for effective faith engagement to support Children on the Move and to refine and finalize an Action Plan.

The three specific themes, supported by JLI Evidence briefs above, were: (1) Spiritual support to children and caregivers as a source of healing and resilience, (2) Strengthening the continuum of protection for children on the move, and (3) Building peaceful societies and combatting xenophobia.

AnchorThe co-organizing partners and Action Plan committee have opened the Action Plan review process to participants and co-organizing partners through November 30th for comments focused on clarification and factual correction.

Please make comments directly to the document here or send them to [email protected]. All comments will be collated and shared with the Action Plan committee for the final document which will be made available in December.

Event details

The Moral Imperative’s “Results for Children: Faith Actors High Level Advocacy Forum in Investing in Early Childhood Development

The event, co-organized by the Moral Imperative to End Extreme Poverty and Arigatou International formed part of the Civil Society Organizations sessions at the just concluded joint Annual Meetings of the World Bank Group and the IMF, 9-12 October, at the Bali International Convention Centre.

Click here to read more about the event on Arigatou End Child Poverty Website

Advocacy Statement

Results for Children: The Moral Imperatives Core Message for Action to Secure Wellbeing Outcomes for Early Childhood

Investing in children can deliver dramatic outcomes for the wellbeing of children. Improvements in the science of child development have also made graphic the devastating consequences of childhood adversity and deprivation. There is now a global consensus that it is possible to achieve wellbeing for children by redressing the drivers of childhood adversity.

Despite ambitious goals and commitments for sustainable development, it seems that the level of effort, reform, innovation and investments needed to achieve key targets is still lacking and that we continue to fail children and the most vulnerable.

Of the world’s more than 7 billion people, 2.2 billion are children. Three quarters of these children, and growing, live in Asia and Africa. Close to 700 million of these children experience multiple life altering deprivation and face the grimmest of life situations and are at risk of unbearable harm.

This tension and the prospect of failing children calls for resolution and action by state and non-state actors and persons of conscience with a view to assuring the wellbeing of all children in our time…continue reading advocacy statement

Click here for brochure.

Agenda

Event Moderator: Dr. Tageldin Hamad, Vice President and Director of UPF UN Relations
Panelists:

  • Ms. Edith Jibunoh, Acting Lead – Faith – Based Initiative,World Bank Group
  • Hon. Agus Gumiwant Kartasasmita –Minister of Social Affairs -Indonesia
  • Dr. Agnes Abuom , Moderator, World Council of Churches Central Committee
  • Ms. Dear N. B. Sinandang, Humanitarian Forum of Indonesia / Joint Learning Initiative
  • Fred Nyabera Director, End Child Poverty– Arigatou International

October 10, 2018 –

Next week a diverse group of organisations will come together for a forum at the Jesuit Curia in Rome where they will discuss how faith leaders can work together to end violence against children on the move.

According to UNICEF more than 28 million children around the world have been forced to flee their homes because of violence and conflict, and the violence they experience is the catalyst for the Faith Action for Children on the Move; Global Partners Forum, October 16-18. Ahead of the event, the 14 organising partners said:

“As people of faith, we are in a unique position to address the rights of children on the move.

“Across different faith backgrounds we feel a call and a responsibility to protect and give a voice to these children. Our calling has compelled us to come together, review what we do well and commit to doing more.”

The issue of children on the move has never been more pressing. Between 2005 and 2015 the number of child refugees worldwide more than doubled. The forum will bring organisations together to commit to a collective action plan on how they can work together in the future to protect, nurture and support children on the move.

“Considering that the majority (84% according to the Pew Research Center) of the world’s population identifies with a religious group, people of faith can and should be acknowledged as a powerful force in the world.

“As faith-based organisations, we believe that we are stronger together, together we can reach the most vulnerable, and together we can have a greater impact on more children.

“We recognise that partnering from different beliefs and religions enhances respect for our common values and respective contributions. We condemn xenophobic and discriminatory narratives and reaffirm the need to speak up with words of solidarity, hospitality and love.”

The role of faith in three key areas affecting children on the move will be discussed by the participants at the forum:

  • Building peaceful societies and combating xenophobia
  • Strengthening the continuum of protection for children on the move
  • Providing spiritual support to children on the move and their caregivers, as a source of healing and resilience

“We hope to provide a way for organisations to partner in protecting children on the move and also include children in decision making and programme design processes.

“Children are the hope of humanity and must be protected and enabled to experience life in its fullness and to transform the societies in which they live.

Signed by the 14 organising partners:

ACT Alliance

ADRA

Anglican Alliance

Arigatou International

International Partnership on Religion and Sustainable Development

Islamic Relief

Joint Learning Initiative on Faith and Local Communities

Mennonite World Conference

Micah Global

Seventh-Day Adventist Church

The Salvation Army

World Evangelical Alliance

World Council of Churches

World Vision

 

 

JLI is hiring a part-time accountant

 

Key Responsibilities:

  • Demonstrated experience in nonprofit accounting with a mix of grant and contract funding
  • Thorough understanding of nonprofit accounting and Generally Accepted Accounting Standards (GAAP)
  • Manage accounts receivable, accounts payable and donor invoicing
  • Prepare and oversee tax compliance, audit and tax return filing
  • Process reimbursement, payroll, employee and consultant time and monthly bank transactions to general ledger, ensuring relevant systems are in place to streamline processing

 

Required qualifications:

  • Accounting or Finance degree;
  • Affinity for and ability to analyze numbers and develop management and funder reporting;
  • Detail oriented with excellent organizational and interpersonal skills;
  • Ability to work both independently and collaboratively;
  • Ability to handle multiple tasks, perform well under pressure, prioritize tasks and meet deadlines and objectives;
  • Adept at presenting complex financial information in a clear manner to various audiences including board, senior management, staff members and outside stakeholders;
  • Excellent written and verbal communication skills with the ability to communicate diplomatically in a diverse, multi-cultural environment;
  • Proficient in the use of QuickBooks and Microsoft Office.

Reports to the Executive Director

Please include cover letter and resume and in the subject line: Accountant in email to [email protected]

 

Experience:

  • QuickBooks: 3 years (Preferred)
  • GAAP: 3 years (Required)
  • Accounting: 3 years (Required)

 

Part-time project and finance assistant also available

The JLI Anti-Trafficking and Modern Slavery Hub is beginning a Hub scoping study on the roles of local faith communities in Anti-Trafficking and Modern Slavery[1]

We are gathering literature from academic repositories, and turn to the Hub members to fill in the gaps.

Key questions:

  • What evidence exists of local faith communities [2] working with victims and survivors of AHT/MS?
  • How do the theological reflections of local faith communities on issues of trafficking and slavery influence their approaches?
  • What lessons can be drawn from the ways that local faith communities approach initiatives that relate to AHT/MS?

We are interested in any examples that illustrate dynamics around religion and anti-trafficking. We invite you to:

    • Submit relevant materials and references. This is to ensure that we have all the main material covered. We are looking for materials that provide key insights into the ways in which religion affects anti-trafficking and modern slavery, such as the role of local faith communities in response. This can include a diverse range of documentation from the grey literature: research reports, web links, policy briefs etc.
    • Submit case studies. A case study is a specific example of work from your organization or one of your partner organisations (of programs or projects, etc.) that highlights the role of religion and/or local faith communities in ending trafficking and modern slavery.  We will also be considering cases where LFCs may be negatively involved in trafficking.
    • Participate in an interview or recommend contacts for interviews *Not all case studies will be selected for interviews but please provide a contact name and email

Interviews can be in place of a case study, as specific cases can be discussed during the interview.

While we invite all contributions on topics related to religion and anti-human trafficking and modern slavery, we are particularly seeking information in the following areas.

  • Sex trafficking
  • Organ and body parts Trafficking
  • Labour Trafficking –land
  • Labour trafficking – maritime
  • Domestic servitude
  • Children (soldiers or child marriage)
  • LGBT communities

[1] The full study outline can be found here

[2] Defining local faith communities:

  • Congregations, mosques and temples, etc.
  • Local/national/indigenous faith-based development or charitable organisations (i.e. local FBOs)
  • Local and national multi-faith-based networks
  • Local and national faith leaders

Note: international FBOs working on this issue, unless they are partnering with an LFC, will not be examined in this scoping study. Also, the principal focus of the JLI is local faith communities based in the global South, or in ‘developing countries’.

Global Partners Forum

October 16th-19th

 

On October 16-19 the Faith Action for Children on the Move Global Partners Forum will be held in Rome, Italy. The Forum provides a platform to bring together a diverse group of faith-based organisations.

The co-organizers, ACT Alliance, ADRA, Anglican Alliance, Arigatou International, Islamic Relief Worldwide, Joint Learning Initiative on Faith & Local Communities, Mennonite World Conference,  Micah Global, The Salvation Army, Seventh-Day Adventist Church, World Council of Churches, World Evangelical Alliance and World Vision believe that by working together we can end violence against migrant, refugee, and displaced children and their families.

In preparation for the Forum, the co-organizers along with participating partners reviewed the evidence and approaches on how to work as faith actors. Three themes emerged which will shape the programme and the collective action plan:

  • Spiritual support to children and caregivers as a source of healing and resilience
  • Strengthening the continuum of protection for children on the move
  • Building peaceful societies and combating xenophobia

Forum Goals

  • Learn: Compile and analyse current responses of faith communities, the programme approaches we use, best practices, policy frameworks, advocacy efforts and gaps.
  • Exchange: Discern, share, and build consensus among faith groups, alongside decision makers, children and communities on issues related to violence, migration, displacement, and trafficking.
  • Inform: Produce a publication capturing the essence of the process, key issues, and the plan of action to inform, inspire, and equip others into the future.
  • Plan: Plan action to increase awareness, strengthen partnerships, improve delivery, scale up interventions, and influence decision-making.

 

Read the Learning Briefs

Learning Brief: Continuum of Protection for Children          Learning Brief: Spiritual Support          Learning Brief: The role of faith in building peaceful societies and combating xenophobia

We invite you to participate in the forum to bring experiences to share on the three themes, or follow along with with us virtually.

Click the link below for further information about the forum, registration, and accommodations can be found below. Please share the information with other colleagues and institutions which may be interested in participating.

 

 

To see the Children on the Move resource platform here

*please feel free to upload & send additional resources as well

Submit your examples of good practices on child-friendly procedures in the migration context

The Office of the Special Representative on migration and refugees is looking for examples of good or promising practices of migration-related procedures that are child-friendly. Selected examples will be published in a compilation of good practices being prepared under the Council of Europe Action plan on protecting refugee and migrant children (2017-2019).

Responding to this call will give states and other relevant stakeholders the opportunity to publicise their good practices, resulting in increased attention for and possible adoption of the practice in other Council of Europe member States.

The deadline for submission of good practice examples is 30 September 2018. Submissions should be sent to [email protected].

For more information, please see the call for good practices, which is available in EnglishFrench and Italian. The template is available in English only.

 

See on COE website

JLI is happy to announce new board members joining the JLI Board of Directors

Catriona Dejean

Catriona Dejean is Tearfund’s Director of Strategy and Impact, and previously headed up the their Impact and Effectiveness Team. Prior to this, she was a consultant in the social enterprise sector, providing advice to UK and international clients. She has also worked for World Vision on development programmes, and at strategy level – predominantly in Latin America. She started her career in environmental consultancy in the private sector. Catriona also served as a trustee for Cafedirect Producers’ Foundation (now Producers’ Direct) – an award-winning fairtrade enterprise, led by farmers across East Africa and Latin America.

 

Christo Greyling

Rev Christo Greyling is the Senior Director for Faith – Advocacy and External Engagement for World Vision International. He was co-responsible for the development of the Channels of Hope methodology which has catalysed nearly 500,000 faith leaders in 45 countries to respond to difficult development issues such as child protection, maternal and child health, HIV and gender. He is passionate to build meaningful partnerships and collaborate with faith based agencies and faith actors to meaningfully contribute towards SDG outcomes and child well-being.

 

Mohammed Shareef

Dr Mohammed Shareef is the Research and Development Manager at the Humanitarian Academy for Development. He is a Fellow of the Royal Asiatic Society (London). He has previously worked for the United Nations and as a Visiting Lecturer in Politics and International Relations of the Middle East at the University of Exeter in the United Kingdom. He is also a former Lecturer in International Relations at the University of Sulaimani in Iraqi Kurdistan. Shareef completed his PhD in International Relations at the University of Durham and has an MSc in International Relations from the University of Bristol in the United Kingdom.

 

Thanks and best wishes to Hiruy Teka from Samaritan’s Purse and Lucas Koach from Food for the Hungry who will be leaving the JLI Board of Directors.

 

Learn more about the JLI Leadership

The JLI Ending Violence Against Children Learning Hub is conducting an intial Hub scoping study on the roles of religion in ending violence against children (EVAC).[1]

We are finishing an evidence review of relevant academic and grey literature, and now turn to the Hub members to continue to fill in the gaps through case studies and interviews. We are interested in any examples that illustrate dynamics around religion and protecting children against violence. We invite you to participate in an interview or recommend contacts for interviews

  • Please recommend persons for interview to cover the following types of examples:
    • Examples of local faith communities (LFCs) or FBOs working to end VAC. How have LFCs utilised their assets/networks/social capital/volunteer force to plan and implement their responses to VAC? What sort of violence has been identified as their specific focus and why?
    • Examples of partnerships between local faith communities and the wider community formal or informal child protection systems. When do partnerships form and when do they not form? Are their instances of best practices for forming partnerships with local faith communities for VAC response?
    • Define how your organisation understands the terms child protection and ending violence against children as relevant to the focus of the case
    • Give a brief overview of the case study context (e.g. region, dates, principal actors, estimated numbers beneficiaries reached)
    • Give a brief overview of the program/project/organisation/partnership that is the focus of the case study
    • Review the opportunities and challenges of local faith community work/partnerships in VAC response in this case
    • Give evidence of good practices and offer recommendations

 

 

While we invite all contributions on topics related to religion and protecting children against violence, we are particularly seeking information in areas that are gaps in the literature. The list below shows areas where we lack information and seek input through case studies. Please consider the points in the final section and whether you have an example that might illustrate the role of religion in these areas. An initial coding of the broad themes represented in the literature on religion and VAC shows the following:

Table – Literature Gaps – JLI EVAC Scoping  

Areas that are not well documented: 

  • Local Faith Communities Specific Contributions 
  • Global South: Religious-based Perpetuation 
  • FBOs (formal and informal) Engagement with Child Protection Systems 
  • Non-Christian Faiths & Traditional Beliefs 
  • N. Africa, Latin America, MENA, South, SE and East Asia 
  • Boys & Adolescents
  • EVAC Champions/Networks in communities 
  • Child Labour/Exploitation 
  • Family-Based VAC
  • Survivor Support: Other than trauma counseling 
  • Forced Migration, Deportation & Asylum 
  • Orphans, Unaccompanied Children, IDPs/Refugees 
  • LGBTI & Persons with Mobility Limitations 

 

Areas that are relatively well documented: 

  • Advocacy & Education Initiatives by I/NGOs (International Non-governmental Organizations)
  • Awareness Raising Among Local Communities as target groups in I/NGO programmes   
  • Girls Specific 
  • Early Marriage 
  • SGBV Generally 
  • School-Based Punishment 
  • Child Combatant Rehabilitation  
  • Trafficking/Sexual Exploitation 
  • Islam (some) 
  • MENA (regarding refugees only) 

 

Areas that are very well documented: 

  • Christianity
  • INGO work 
  • North America (US & Canada)  
  • Sub-Saharan Africa 
  • Domestic Abuse Prevention & Response (US) 
  • Violence Against Women as Priority Content 
  • Survivor Support: Counseling & Psychosocial 
  • Religious-Based Sexual Abuse (US & Ireland) 
  • Corporal Punishment 
  • Children’s Voices on EVAC 
  • Joint Interfaith Advocacy Networks

 

[1] The full study outline can be found here: https://evac.jliflc.com/resources/evac-hub-scoping-proposal/

Religion and FBO inputs to the Global Compacts: recent meetings at the UN

A meeting at the UN hosted by the  Permanent Observer Mission of the Holy See to the United Nations and Caritas brought together global religious leaders who called the world to share the journey with migrants and refugees. Watch the full event here

 

As part of a series of related events UNICEF, NGO Committee on UNICEF and Caritas Internationalis co-organized a side event on Interfaith Responses to the Rights of Refugee and Migrant Children and their Families.

 

A panel moderated by Ame Esangbedo of SOS Childrens’ Villages, of speakers including representatives from Lutheran World Federation, Islamic Relief, Religions for Peace and JLI discussed key issues from a religious and FBO perspective, including solutions and challenges around addressing the needs of refugee and migrant children and their families with a focus on keeping families together, provision of services and combatting xenophobia.

JLI panel presentation (click for presentation) focused on evidence and ongoing research relating to Faith-based responses to Children’s Rights and Migration.

 

Other events covered: