Copenhagen May 2019

JLI, in its role as a PaRD Knowledge Partner, attended the PaRD General Assembly of Members in Copenhagen to report to the PaRD workstreams on study progress as well as share JLI Hub and Project work.

JLI is currently supporting evidence building for the workstreams on  Health – SDG 3Gender Equality and Empowerment – SDG 5and Sustaining Peace – SDG 16. JLI Research Advisor, Susanna Trotta, President, Jean Duff and Senior Programs and Knowledge Manager, Stacy Nam attended and reported to the workstreams in parallel sessions. Members agreed to start new working groups in capacity building and Environment, Water and Climate Action. JLI looks forward to aligning the JLI climate webinars and evidence building with the working group.

Jean Duff, JLI President, reporting on JLI-PaRD Workstream Studies in plenary on May 2

 

JLI presented in the open sessions on both days on three themes:

  1. UNICEF Faith for Social Behavior Change Initiative
  2. Refugees and Forced Migration Hub and accompanying policy work on related to the Global Compact on Refugees and Local Humanitarian Leadership-see the upcoming Beirut Event
  3. Ending Violence Against Children Study. to be launched soon. stay tuned for launch webinar details

Read more about the sessions on the PaRD website here

Editors: Emma Tomalin and Caroline Starkey

The University of Leeds is looking for contributors to a new and exciting handbook on the topic of Religion, Gender and Society. Underpinning the volume, is an awareness that it is impossible for scholars, activists and policy makers to understand and explain contemporary societies and to contribute towards positive social change unless attention is paid to the role that religion plays in shaping gender identities. This handbook will provide a survey of the current state of research on religions, gender and society. Its aim will be to make a major contribution to the research agenda for the next 5-7 years, to redefine existing areas within the context of international research, and to highlight emerging and cutting edge areas.

If you are interesting in being considered, please send a short abstract/chapter outline to Dr Caroline Starkey ([email protected]) by Monday 1st April 2019. Final chapters will be due in autumn/winter 2019, with publication planned for mid-2020.

See more information and topics here

March 11, 2019

By Olivia Wilkinson and Susanna Trotta on the Georgetown University Berkley Center blog

This blog post highlights Education and Refugee Response from the JLIFLC policy brief on the implementation of the Global Compact on Refugees with faith actors.

“In the Global Compact on Refugees’ program of action, education falls within a section on meeting needs and supporting communities. The main provision within the compact is for the support of national education systems, which in many cases will include schools that are run by faith-based institutions and operating within national laws and policies. However, refugee children can struggle to gain places (especially in over-burdened systems) and integrate into new education systems. Issues related to which curricula to follow and to accreditation between home, host, and destination curricula have caused problems. Instead, children on the move may seek non-formal education opportunities, which can also be run by faith actors, such as sessions in religious buildings with provisions funded by the faith community.”

See full Georgetown Berkley Center Post Here

New Knowledge Partnership between Joint Learning Initiative on Faith and Local Communities (JLI) and the International Partnership on Religion and Sustainable Development (PaRD)

 

On October 27, 2018, JLI and PaRD signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) at JLI’s Annual Board Meeting. Jonathan Duffy, JLI Board Chair and Jean Duff, JLI President and Thomas Lawo, PaRD Secretariat Coordinator signed for their respective organizations. The PaRD Steering Group ratified the MOU at its meeting in Toronto in November 2018.

 

The JLI and PaRD seek full and appropriate engagement of the capacities of faith-based and religious groups in the achievement of the SDGs through effective partnerships with public sector and secular entities, as well as among religious groups themselves. JLI brings knowledge partner capacities, a proven track record in preparing evidence reports, briefs, calls to action, conference programs, peer-reviewed article, and journals. PaRD focuses on joint  joint activities in its three areas of engagement knowledge exchange, capacity building, and joint advocacy.

 

JLI will provide evidence support to PaRD’s three work streams:

  • SDG 3 Health with a focus on faith and adolescent sexual and reproductive health,
  • SDG 5 Gender Equality and Empowerment with a focus on the role of faith-based partnerships in preventing and addressing gender-based violence and
  • SDG 16 Sustaining Peace with a focus on effective peacebuilding

 

The studies and evidence briefs will be co-designed and will draw upon PaRD and JLI members’ information and experiences, which will, in turn, inform joint research and advocacy agendas. Each of the three workstreams will present preliminary reports for discussion during the PaRD annual meeting on May 2 and 3 in Copenhagen.

 

Please visit www.pard.international and read more on PaRD and its members’ activities! Read about the JLI’s work through learning hubs and partnerships at jliflc.com.

The Role of Local Faith Actors In Implementing The Global Compact On Refugees

February 18, 2019

Amman, Jordan

 

On February 18th, local and regional and international actors from all sectors met in Amman, Jordan for a half-day seminar. The meeting attendees included government agencies, think tanks, community-based and humanitarian organizations including faith-based organizations. The Jordanian Hashemite Charity Organization, World Vision International, Anglican Communion, Muslim Aid, Middle East Council of Churches, Caritas Jordan, ICMC, Syria Relief, Tearfund and Mennonite Central Committee were among the organizations represented.

The seminar facilitated discussion on opportunities for increased engagement with local faith actors, examples of current programs and recommendations for better policies and practice to address refugee response in the region.

 

Seminar Goal: To continue and strengthen partnerships and programs to implement the Global Compact on Refugees (GCR) by sharing and discussing the critical ways of faith actors respond to refugees and forced migration.

Attendees and speakers at LHL Amman Seminar

Attendees and speakers at LHL Amman Seminar

 

Speakers included:

  • Mr. Mohammed Kilani, Secretary General Deputy, Jordan Hashemite Charity Organization – Welcome
  • Douglas DiSalvo, Senior Protection Officer, UNHCR – Faith and Protection: partnering with religious and FBOS to implement the Global Compact on Refugees
  • Dr. Zakaria Al Sheikh, Trustee and Country Director, Al-Imdaad International (Jordan) – The religious imperative to care for the stranger—examples from Jordan.
  • Jean Duff, President, Joint Learning Initiative on Faith and Local Communities – Roles of faith actors in implementing the Global Compact on Refugees

Amanda Rives, Regional Policy and Advocacy Director, Middle East and Eastern Europe Region
External Engagement Sr. Advisor, Child Protection & Participation, World Vision International chaired a panel on local faith refugee response with:

  • Fr Mihai Pavel Director Faith and Development Middle East Region, World Vision International
  • Inshirah Mousa – Director of JSR
  • Dr. Kawas, Middle East Council of Churches
  • Sheikh Zayed Hammad, President, Kitab wa Sunneh

Amanda Rives and Marwan Al Hennawi, JHCO chaired the final Q&A Session

 

Co-hosts and Speakers at the LHL Amman Seminar

Co-hosts and Speakers at the LHL Amman Seminar

Key points discussed by the speakers, panels and participants:

  1. The Facts about Local Faith Actors’ care for refugees on the move and in place

The possibility for significant engagement of local faith actors can have much greater depth and scope.  This is seen by the many examples and ways local faith actors help refugees throughout their journey around the world. There are still many unmet possibilities for better ways to care for refugees from local actors, including local faith actors.

“Faith can play a key role in refugees’ experiences and rebuilding their lives. Stakeholders should help make connections with local faith leaders and facilitate spiritual support across all stages and places if desired by refugees. “ –Jean Duff, Joint Learning Initiative on Faith and Local Communities

 

2. Better ways to work collaborate better together across sectors

The attendees discussed recommendations for joint burden and responsibility sharing and the areas of support (Reception and Admission, Meeting Needs, and Supporting Communities), and solutions. These are based on JLI’s analysis of faith actors’ strengths and weaknesses, the current examples of programs, and ways to better work across sectors together for a joint response.

“Refugees often find comfort in being able to continue their prayer and religious duties. Faith sensitive providers like JHCO can help link refugees with faith leaders and place of worship and provide psychosocial support.” -Ayman Al Mufleh, Jordanian Hashemite Charity Organization

 

 

Co-Hosts: The Joint Learning Initiative on Faith and Local Communities, the Jordan Hashemite Charity Organization, World Vision, and the UN Interagency Task Force on Religion and Development

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other news:

Jordanian Hashemite Charity Organization release in the Jordan Times

 

This event is part of a larger series of dynamic events on the intersection of faith actors and the Global Compact on Refugees. Other events will be held in Beirut, Brussels and Geneva funded by the Henry Luce Foundation

 

Read more about JLI’s research on the roles of local faith actors and the Global Compact on Refugees. Brief available in English and Arabic.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accompanying Resource Brief

The JLI recently hosted an online event to learn about the Global Compact on Refugees (GCR) adoption directly from UNHCR. JLI Research Director launched our new policy brief on faith actors and the implementation of the GCR. A range of organizations about their reflections on faith and the GCR.

Agenda and quick highlights

Welcome – Jean Duff, JLI Coordinator

Update on the GCR and role of faith actors – Rachel Criswell, NGO and Faith Liaison, UNHCR

  • With increasing numbers of refugees and protracted discplacement worldwide, robust support from the start to bolster areas such as infrastructure, water supply, hospitals, schools, and roads. The Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework (CRRF) was set out in the New York Declaration (NYD) for Refugees and Migrants (Sept 2016), adopted by all 193 Member States of the UN.CRRF forms the basis of the new Global Compact on Refugees (GCR), which operationalize it through a Programme of Action and translate policies into practice. The GCR is based on the experiences in practical application of the CRRF in concrete situations in the field.   The GCR calls for the response to a crisis to supplement humanitarian services with development support for refugee and host communities alike. After two years of consultation, on December 17, member states excluding the US and Hungary ratified the GCR at the UN General Assembly.
  • Good practice case studies, implementation of the CRRF and further information on comprehensive refugee response can be found at http://www.globalcrrf.org

Role of Faith Actors in Implementing the Global Compact – Dr. Olivia Wilkinson, JLI Director of Research (Launch of new JLI policy brief)

  • “Faith-based actors could support the planning and delivery of arrangements to assist refugees and host communities, including in the areas of conflict prevention, reconciliation, and peacebuilding, as well as other relevant areas.”– Global Compact on Refugees, UNHCR
  • Roles of Faith Actors in Arrangements for Burden- and Responsibility-sharing and three Areas in Need of Support (1.Reception and Admission, 2.Meeting Needs and Supporting Communities, 3.Solutions).
  • Faith actors are actively involved in responding to forced displacement, well-positioned to mobilize resources, and provide material and immaterial support to foster appropriate, tailored response.
    • Faith actors’ experience and role should be acknowledged and considered in the design and implementation of every stage of the humanitarian response to forced displacement.
    • Faith can play an instrumental role in forced migrants’ experiences. Stakeholders should work to more fully understand this aspect of displacement experiences and facilitate spiritual support across all stages and places of displacement.
  • See Policy brief funded by the Luce Foundation for case studies and recommondations.

Learning exchange on Faith and GCR

  • Emily Wei, Catholic Relief Services
  • Atallah FitzGibbon, Islamic Relief Worldwide
  • Dr Katherine Marshall, Berkley Center for Religion, Peace, and World Affairs & World Faiths Development Dialogue
    • Presented three initiatives in research and policy in refugee issues
    • Research on critical areas in refugee issues in conflict countires ex. Nigeria
    • Host Country research in Kenya and third country resettlement countries ex. US: Diaspora communities and religion with Pluralism Project
    • Presented a two-year project supported by Georgetown University’s Board of Regents
      • various case studies underway currently for example in the northern triangle countries and reception in the US
      • Need to understand better specific facets of religious approaches, including links to conflicts spurring migration and refugee flows
      • Mapping of purposeful interventions, learning lessons from good and bad practice
      • Need to understand better specific facets of religious approaches, including links to conflicts spurring migration and refugee flows
      • Mapping of purposeful interventions, learning lessons from good and bad practice
      • See Berkley Center refugee site
    • G20 Recommenations
  • Giulia McPherson, Jesuit Refugee Service
    • Presented JRS Advocacy Efforts and
    • Key Messages:
      • Accompany all vulnerable people on the move and to provide for their basic needs.
      • Invest in medium- and long-term development approaches to the humanitarian needs of forcibly displaced persons.
      • Invest in economic and infrastructure growth within host communities.
      • Share the financial burden and other costs among all countries.
  • Christo Greyling, World Vision International
  • Tom Albinson, International Association for Refugees (with Christine Macmillan at World Evangelical Alliance)
    • Presented IAFR Continuum of Reponse. Model to help faith communities understand how to support people in recovery and long-term durable solutions
      • helping people who are displaced or are refugees find support, people recovering from trauma and people who are in new contexts, people who need spiritual support and listening to those displaced to affirm their dignity be a part of the solution

Closing remarks and Wrap Up

Join the JLI Refugee Hub for continued joint learning

Related Resources:

Read the Policy Brief

 

 

 

 

 

Accompanying Resource Brief

Presentation PowerPoint

JLI New Policy Brief- Faith Actors and Global Compact on Refugees

To maximize the significant opportunities presented by the Global Compact on Refugees (GCR), the international community must recognize the experience and capabilities of faith actors (FAs) and break down existing barriers to partnerships to enable a more comprehensive, effective, and durable response.

While the GCR does acknowledge that: “Faith-based actors could support the planning and delivery of arrangements to assist refugees and host communities, including in the areas of conflict prevention, reconciliation, and peacebuilding, as well as other relevant areas,” the critical and comprehensive role that FAs play – as well as their potential for efficient service delivery – warrants a fuller and more nuanced examination.

The following policy brief provides a set of recommendations based on evidence concerning the multiple roles that faith and faith actors play across different stages and spaces of forced displacement. The brief is aligned with the GCR’s sections on Arrangements for Burden- and Responsibility-sharing and its three Areas in Need of Support (Reception and Admission, Meeting Needs and Supporting Communities, and Solutions)

This brief and corresponding resource brief were funded through the Luce Foundation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read the supporting ‘Resource Brief’ that provides a reading list of articles related to faith, refugees, and the Global Compact

Partners Forum – Rome, Oct 16-18

JLI co-hosted the Faith Action for Children on the Move Forum with ore than 185 leaders originating from 38 countries and representing 85 organizations gathered at the General Curia of the Society of Jesus in Rome. The forum shared learning around three key evidence-based themes for effective faith engagement to support Children on the Move and to refine and finalize an Action Plan.

The three specific themes, supported by JLI Evidence briefs above, were: (1) Spiritual support to children and caregivers as a source of healing and resilience, (2) Strengthening the continuum of protection for children on the move, and (3) Building peaceful societies and combatting xenophobia.

AnchorThe co-organizing partners and Action Plan committee have opened the Action Plan review process to participants and co-organizing partners through November 30th for comments focused on clarification and factual correction.

Please make comments directly to the document here or send them to [email protected]. All comments will be collated and shared with the Action Plan committee for the final document which will be made available in December.

Event details

The Moral Imperative’s “Results for Children: Faith Actors High Level Advocacy Forum in Investing in Early Childhood Development

The event, co-organized by the Moral Imperative to End Extreme Poverty and Arigatou International formed part of the Civil Society Organizations sessions at the just concluded joint Annual Meetings of the World Bank Group and the IMF, 9-12 October, at the Bali International Convention Centre.

Click here to read more about the event on Arigatou End Child Poverty Website

Advocacy Statement

Results for Children: The Moral Imperatives Core Message for Action to Secure Wellbeing Outcomes for Early Childhood

Investing in children can deliver dramatic outcomes for the wellbeing of children. Improvements in the science of child development have also made graphic the devastating consequences of childhood adversity and deprivation. There is now a global consensus that it is possible to achieve wellbeing for children by redressing the drivers of childhood adversity.

Despite ambitious goals and commitments for sustainable development, it seems that the level of effort, reform, innovation and investments needed to achieve key targets is still lacking and that we continue to fail children and the most vulnerable.

Of the world’s more than 7 billion people, 2.2 billion are children. Three quarters of these children, and growing, live in Asia and Africa. Close to 700 million of these children experience multiple life altering deprivation and face the grimmest of life situations and are at risk of unbearable harm.

This tension and the prospect of failing children calls for resolution and action by state and non-state actors and persons of conscience with a view to assuring the wellbeing of all children in our time…continue reading advocacy statement

Click here for brochure.

Agenda

Event Moderator: Dr. Tageldin Hamad, Vice President and Director of UPF UN Relations
Panelists:

  • Ms. Edith Jibunoh, Acting Lead – Faith – Based Initiative,World Bank Group
  • Hon. Agus Gumiwant Kartasasmita –Minister of Social Affairs -Indonesia
  • Dr. Agnes Abuom , Moderator, World Council of Churches Central Committee
  • Ms. Dear N. B. Sinandang, Humanitarian Forum of Indonesia / Joint Learning Initiative
  • Fred Nyabera Director, End Child Poverty– Arigatou International

October 10, 2018 –

Next week a diverse group of organisations will come together for a forum at the Jesuit Curia in Rome where they will discuss how faith leaders can work together to end violence against children on the move.

According to UNICEF more than 28 million children around the world have been forced to flee their homes because of violence and conflict, and the violence they experience is the catalyst for the Faith Action for Children on the Move; Global Partners Forum, October 16-18. Ahead of the event, the 14 organising partners said:

“As people of faith, we are in a unique position to address the rights of children on the move.

“Across different faith backgrounds we feel a call and a responsibility to protect and give a voice to these children. Our calling has compelled us to come together, review what we do well and commit to doing more.”

The issue of children on the move has never been more pressing. Between 2005 and 2015 the number of child refugees worldwide more than doubled. The forum will bring organisations together to commit to a collective action plan on how they can work together in the future to protect, nurture and support children on the move.

“Considering that the majority (84% according to the Pew Research Center) of the world’s population identifies with a religious group, people of faith can and should be acknowledged as a powerful force in the world.

“As faith-based organisations, we believe that we are stronger together, together we can reach the most vulnerable, and together we can have a greater impact on more children.

“We recognise that partnering from different beliefs and religions enhances respect for our common values and respective contributions. We condemn xenophobic and discriminatory narratives and reaffirm the need to speak up with words of solidarity, hospitality and love.”

The role of faith in three key areas affecting children on the move will be discussed by the participants at the forum:

  • Building peaceful societies and combating xenophobia
  • Strengthening the continuum of protection for children on the move
  • Providing spiritual support to children on the move and their caregivers, as a source of healing and resilience

“We hope to provide a way for organisations to partner in protecting children on the move and also include children in decision making and programme design processes.

“Children are the hope of humanity and must be protected and enabled to experience life in its fullness and to transform the societies in which they live.

Signed by the 14 organising partners:

ACT Alliance

ADRA

Anglican Alliance

Arigatou International

International Partnership on Religion and Sustainable Development

Islamic Relief

Joint Learning Initiative on Faith and Local Communities

Mennonite World Conference

Micah Global

Seventh-Day Adventist Church

The Salvation Army

World Evangelical Alliance

World Council of Churches

World Vision